The production of Buffalo nickels went into boom in 1936. The improving economy increased the demand for these coins. That year, having more than 150 million minted coins, is the most common for the series. There were 3 minting facilities that produced the Buffalo nickels. Philadelphia took the lion’s share of minting duties and struck 118,997,000 nickels in 1936. This minting facility did not leave any mark on the coins. Denver struck 24,814,000 nickels with a D initial. There were 14,930,000 nickels struck by San Francisco with an S initial.

Although more common than most, the Buffalo nickels series has valuable and noteworthy varieties. Proof coinage returned to the United States coin lineup in 1936. There were 4,420 proof 1936 Buffalo nickels. Buffalo nickels during 1913 to 1916 were matte proof. Proofs made during 1936 and thereafter feature the mirror-like surface. Most collectors today are familiar with that look. The 1936 Buffalo nickel value varies a lot. A 1936 proof Buffalo nickel can be around $1,400.

Value in the Old Things

The 1936-D Three-legged Buffalo nickel was another remarkable variety in the series. It was a result of an overzealous polishing by a minting facility employee. The original aim of the wiping of the die was to clean the imperfections on its surface. The employee removed 1 of the legs of the buffalo and some details of the die. Values for these coins are high. A piece can start at around $1,000 dollars if it is in very good grade.

A good grade regular 1936 Buffalo nickel is worth at least $1. For fine condition, value increases to $1.75. It can be worth $3 if the condition is extremely fine. For uncirculated 1936 coins, it can go for up to $9. The 1936-D and 1936-S have almost the same value. Except that uncirculated coins can be up to $12.